Q&A

How do I become a member of London Right to Life?
Please contact us or fill in the form and mail it to us. Memberships start and are renewed every calendar year.

I understand that abortion is a difficult issue, but what about abortion for rape/incest?
Because rape and incest are such sensitive topics, they are frequently used to open and even widen the doors to abortion on demand. What one must realize is that the last thing the victim should receive would be the second trauma of abortion. When we say that life is sacred, then that unborn child’s life is sacred too, regardless of the events surrounding the conception. We must also protect and help the victim of rape/incest, not by “bandaging” the wound with an abortion but by providing a listening ear, an accepting hug and an encouraging word.

What about abortion for the mother’s health?
This is another sensitive issue which is used by the pro-abortion lobby to keep abortion laws as liberal as possible. Statistics show us that most abortions are done, for purely elective (convenience) reasons and not to save the life of the mother. Other than tubal pregnancies, very few obstetricians have ever been truly forced to having to “choose” between the mother and her baby’s life. Most of the time, with our advanced technology, they can treat both, as medical conditions that genuinely threaten the mother’s life are now extremely rare. What is troublesome is that the term “health” is so broad that anything can pretty much fall under it.

Don’t women have the right to control their own bodies?
Common sense and modern science both recognize that pregnancy involves two bodies. Our society limits rights of individuals if they violate the rights of others. Pregnancy is the only case where one can infringe on the rights of someone else without any repercussion. A pregnant body is unique in the fact that there are two different heartbeats, two different brain patterns, two different blood types, and even two different sexes.

What kind of abortion laws do we have in Canada?
In 1969, the Federal Government “decriminalized” abortion by making it legal under certain conditions, specifically in cases where the mother’s health was at “risk”. The law did not specify or define health, so any physician could and has since gone around it to justify abortion. In 1988, the Supreme Court of Canada scrapped any remaining laws pertaining to abortion, leaving Canada without any abortion laws whatsoever. In Canada, abortions are allowed at any time, during pregnancy, even up until the mother goes into labour. Our law does not recognize or give fathers the right to protect their unborn children from abortion.

 

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